HITWA08 Program

Forum Program - At A Glance

The theme of the forum is E-Health Landscapes - with the morning session focusing on the big picture issues and the afternoon devoted to highlighting excellent and innovative e-health projects occurring in WA.

8:00 - 8:30 Registration & Coffee
8:30 - 8:45 Introduction & Welcome Ms Louise Schaper, HISA(WA) Chair
8:45 - 9:00 Official Opening Mr Benjamin (Ben) Sana Wyatt, MLA Member for Victoria Park
9:00 - 9:40 The Federal E-Health Landscape Clinical Associate Professor Peter Sprivulis
9:40 - 10:15 The WA E-Health Landscape Mr Richard McFadden, Chief Information Officer, WA Department of Health
10:15 - 10.30 Federal and State Strategy Discussions Q&A
10:30 - 10:50 Morning Tea
10:50 - 11:20 The Rural and Remote E-Health Landscape: To the Horizon and Beyond Associate Professor Isabelle Ellis, Combined Universities Centre for Rural Health
11:20 - 11:50 The Aged Care E-Health Landscape Mr Stuart Hope, Managing Director, Autumncare
11:50 - 12:20 Chronic Disease Management - Who Cares? Mr Stephen Kalyniuk, The Information Group
12:20 - 1:05 Lunch
1:05 - 1:25 Audience Response Systems and Electronic Whiteboards. Tools or Toys? Mr Travis Ingram, Information Technologist, Imaging Division, RPH
1:25 - 1:45 Foetal Heart Rate Monitoring From Home? Dr Alfred Tan, Senior Lecturer, School of Computer and Information Science, Edith Cowan University
1:45 - 2:05 SMS Reminders For Out-Patient Services Dr Peter Dewar, Project Director Out-Patient Reform WA
2:05 - 2:25 WA PACS – Where It’s Been and Where It’s Going Mr Phil Jones, WA PACS Manager, Department of Health
2:25 - 2:45 Current State of Bioinformatics in Australia Dr Amandeep Sidhu, WA Centre for Comparative Genomics, Murdoch University
2:45 - 3:05 Afternoon Tea
3:05 - 3:25 What Are Doctors’ Attitudes Towards Electronic Medical/Health Records (EMRs/EHRs) at Princess Margaret Hospital for Children? Ms Julia Logan, Head of Department, Patient Information Management Services, Child and Adolescent Service (PMH & KEMH)
3:25 - 3:45 Connecting Health Professionals Electronically - An Open Approach Dr David Glance, Director, UWA Centre for Software Practice, University of Western Australia
3:45 - 4:05 Applications of an Internet-Facilitated Disease Management System in the Western Australian Health Sector Dr Caroline Spiranovic, Research and Development Associate, Sentiens Pty Ltd
4:05 - 4:25 Overcoming Obstacles – Blind Triumph in IT and Computer Networking Environments Ms Geraldine Lane, Lecturer, School of Information Systems, Curtin University of Technology
4:25 - 4:35 Closing Remarks Mr Travis Ingram, HIMAA(WA) President
4:35 – 5:00 Wine and Cheese

 

Forum Program - Detailed

 


8:00 – 8:30 REGISTRATION & COFFEE
8:30 – 8:45 Introduction & Welcome Ms Louise Schaper, HISA(WA) Chair
8:45 - 9:00 Official Opening To Be Advised
9:00 - 9:40 The Federal E-Health Landscape Clinical Associate Professor Peter Sprivulis

Abstract
Australian healthcare is faced with daunting challenges during the first half of the 21st century. Relentless growth in demand for healthcare services, where every year will be the hardest year, will be the norm. This rise in demand is fuelled by population ageing, increasing rates of chronic disease and rising health consumer expectations and healthcare technology costs. Fractured systems of healthcare delivery, characterised by poor information sharing, stand in the way of effective reform to meet these challenges. Healing these fractured systems is hampered by the inherent complexity and poor alignment of Australian healthcare funding and policy settings with desirable healthcare service delivery mechanisms, information technology adoption and desirable healthcare outcomes. Investment in national e-health infrastructure, including a national shared electronic health record, will play an important role in rising to the challenge of reforming Australian healthcare. This presentation will address the role of e-health in Australian health reform and talk to current and future developments on the Federal e-health landscape.

9:40 - 10:15 The WA E-Health Landscape Mr Richard McFadden, Chief Information Officer, WA Department of Health
10:15 - 10.30 Federal and State Strategy Discussions Q&A
10:30 - 10:50 MORNING TEA
10:50 - 11:20 The Rural and Remote E-Health Landscape: To the Horizon and Beyond Associate Professor Isabelle Ellis, Combined Universities Centre for Rural Health, co-author Associate Professor Ann Larson

Abstract
Remote and rural Australia is characterised by vast distances and sparse population density, but as you look across the wide brown land of remote Australia you can’t help but wonder what is over the horizon… a beautiful gorge, a hidden oasis; a salt pan. Provision of health services across Australia is influenced by geography, case load and practitioner lifestyle preference. The challenge of providing equitable access to health care for remote and rural residents requires innovative solutions to be developed, tried and rigorously evaluated. This paper will discuss a range of services that have demonstrated the cost benefits, utility and acceptability of telehealth services for diagnostic services, clinical and rehabilitative care; and health promotion in rural and remote Australia. It will also discuss two services that have held much promise and are yet to deliver on improving access to specialist services. We will also explore one service that is just over the horizon that holds much promise in emergency care but awaits trial.

11:20 - 11:50 The Aged Care E-Health Landscape Mr Stuart Hope, Managing Director, Autumncare

Abstract
The aged care industry consists of a small number of large organisations and many small providers who have traditionally relied on paper to manage their clinical and administrative functions. It has lagged behind other sectors of the health care industry but is rapidly catching up. The aged care sector has the opportunity to take advantage of lessons learned in other industries and the opportunity to utilise the latest technology without too many legacy systems to impede implementation. This talk provides an introduction to current developments in aged care and how e-health systems and technology have the potential to make substantial contributions to the sector. It will also describe some of the architectures such as Services Oriented Architecture (SOA) and mobile technologies being used in the aged care sector that provide functionality to the clinical areas for assessments and medication management as well as providing a pathway to the future. Software as a Service will also be discussed as a cost effective delivery mechanism for the smaller providers. Also discussed will be a future scenario that ties together these technologies and assists in eliminating bottlenecks and increasing productivity.

11:50 - 12:20 Chronic Disease Management - Who Cares? Mr Stephen Kalyniuk, The Information Group

Abstract
An estimated one million Australians aged 25 years and over have diabetes, although around half of these people are currently undiagnosed. The number of adults with diabetes has trebled since 1981. In May 2006 the HDWA Diabetes standard as related to Diabetes Registers stated, “Hospitals, health services and general practices caring for people with diabetes should maintain a register of all patients on their service”. A Perth based company, The Information Group has developed a Chronic Disease Management software application that has been deployed across 3 acute care hospitals and 8 polyclinics in Singapore. The software meets all of the HDWA Diabetes Register Performance Indicators and requirements for collection of data as required by HDWA for completion of an annual cycle of care for patients with diabetes mellitus. This same software could be:
1. Implemented as a single instance across all hospitals in Perth.
2. Be configured to help manage patients with other chronic diseases.
The presentation will discuss development of the software and how usage of it has evolved since the inception of it 3 years ago.

12:20 - 1:05 LUNCH
1:05 - 1:25 Audience Response Systems and Electronic Whiteboards. Tools or Toys? Mr Travis Ingram, Information Technologist, Imaging Division, RPH

Abstract
The Imaging Division at Royal Perth Hospital purchased an Audience Response System and Electronic Whiteboard for an education event in 2008. There is no doubt that they are wonderful toys to use, but are they also very useful tools? This presentation is an interactive review on the uptake of the technology in the Imaging Division at Royal Perth Hospital.

1:25 - 1:45 Foetal Heart Rate Monitoring From Home? Dr Alfred Tan, Senior Lecturer, School of Computer and Information Science, Edith Cowan University

Abstract
The advances of modern microelectronic and computing technologies have allowed self-monitoring of blood pressure at home. Can we do the same for foetal heart rate (FHR) monitoring for ante-natal care? With the advances in mobile communications and mobile smart phone technologies, we are embarking on creating such a possibility at Edith Cowan University. In this presentation we shall look at some past histories of remote monitoring of FHR and we shall look at some current international research in FHR monitoring and analysis. We shall also look at some of the design challenges we face in our current research. Ultimately, we shall discuss the possibility and challenges for realising our vision of self-monitoring FHR for ante-natal care from home. Who knows? Maybe one day, self-monitoring FHR kits will available over the counter from your local chemist.

1:45 - 2:05 SMS Reminders For Out-Patient Services Dr Peter Dewar, Project Director Out-Patient Reform WA

Abstract
In response to high Non-attendance rates at Public out-patient clinics in Perth an SMS reminder system has been trialled. Initial results indicate significant improvement in reduction of DNA rates. Presentation will examine the background of similar systems, infrastructure development in Perth and ongoing operational considerations in optimising impact of innovation.

2:05 - 2:25 WA PACS – Where It’s Been and Where It’s Going Mr Phil Jones, WA PACS Manager, Department of Health

Abstract
Digitising the Tertiary Radiology environments commenced back in 2001 with a pilot PACS (Picture Archiving and Communication System) implementation at Fremantle Hospital. This successful project led to a business case and PACS/RIS implementation at the remaining tertiary hospitals; Royal Perth, Sir Charles Gairdner, Princess Margaret and King Edward Memorial Hospitals between 2003 and 2004. Subsequently Rockingham Hospital (2006) and Swan Districts Hospital (2008) leveraged the centralised infrastructure becoming the most recent sites to move into the digital Radiology environment. Plans are in place to have Perth Chest Clinic digitised by 2009 and a large WACHS project to move many of the regional and rural sites into PACS will see the majority of Public Radiology Services Digitised by 2010. Breast Screen WA is also in the planning stages for digitisation of their Radiology Service. Challenges include keeping the system current, capacity planning and Image/result communication beyond the Tertiary Health Network.

2:25 - 2:45 Current State of Bioinformatics in Australia Dr Amandeep Sidhu, WA Centre for Comparative Genomics, Murdoch University

Abstract
Bioinformatics has to deal with exponentially growing sets of highly inter-related and rapidly evolving types of data that are heavily used by humans and computers. Therefore, it is important to consider the following issues when handling data in bioinformatics. Firstly, the volume of data has grown exponentially, doubling in less than two years. This growth has been sustained since the beginning of molecular biology 20 years ago and all indications are that this will continue for some time to come. This poses a serious problem in terms of data management and requires many scalable solutions. Secondly, the data are disseminated in a myriad of various databases that are duplicated in several repositories. Thirdly, these databases have heterogeneous formats. Most of them are accessible under the form of flat files. They are weakly connected with hyperlinks. These considerations are very relevant for interconnection and integration-oriented biological data management approaches. Perhaps the problems of data integration and standardization could be addressed more easily in the context of a more general logical structure. General biological data resources are databases rather than knowledge bases: they describe miscellaneous objects according to the database schema, but no representation of general concepts and their relationships is given. Recently, this problem is addressed by developing ontologies for knowledge sharing in molecular biology. Ontologies provide a conceptual framework for a structured representation of the meaning, through a common vocabulary, in a given domain - in this case, biological or medical- that can be used by either humans or automated software agents in the domain. This shared vocabulary usually includes concepts, relationships between concepts, definitions of these concepts and relationships and also the possibility of defining ontology rules and axioms, in order to define a mechanism to control the objects that can be introduced in the ontology and to apply logical inference. This presentation will address the open issues in Data Representation and Data Integration Strategies utilised throughout Oceania and by some of the leading international centres of excellence.

2:45 - 3:05 AFTERNOON TEA
3:05 - 3:25 What Are Doctors’ Attitudes Towards Electronic Medical/Health Records (EMRs/EHRs) at Princess Margaret Hospital for Children? Ms Julia Logan, Head of Department, Patient Information Management Services, Child and Adolescent Service (PMH & KEMH), co-author Mr Phil Jones, Department of Health WA

Abstract
Doctors were surveyed to determine attitudes towards dimensions of an EMR (privacy, confidentiality and security; record content; patients accessing their information, and medical record medium preferences). Attitude statements and one open-ended question were included in a questionnaire and a principal components analysis undertaken. Use of computers and rating of their level of ability with computers were assessed. A high percentage of respondents were concerned that data in the EMR may become corrupted, with the same percentage agreeing and disagreeing that information stored in the EMR will be secure. Doctors were concerned that electronic information is open to unauthorised access by persons outside the hospital and were also concerned about unauthorised access by users within the hospital. Equal numbers agreed and disagreed that EMRs will offer the opportunity to communicate more effectively. Variation has been shown in attitudes towards the EMR with doctors indicating concern about patients accessing information and of the risks associated with storage of patient information in an EMR.

3:25 - 3:45 Connecting Health Professionals Electronically - An Open Approach Dr David Glance, Director, UWA Centre for Software Practice, University of Western Australia

Abstract
In providing a solution to allow health professionals across a region to communicate with each other seamlessly and securely, universal access was taken as the guiding principle in the selection and design of the software and technology. This principle precluded the adoption of hardware-based implementations of managed health networks and the adoption of security implemented through the use of public key encryption, adopting rather a simpler internet-banking style approach to security. A further guiding design decision to ensuring the wide-spread adoption of the secure messaging across disparate health groups and organisations was to allow flexible access to the functionality offered, blending where possible with existing processes and software. The Medical Message Exchange (MMEx) software was a result of this process and principles and its success will be measured by its pervasive adoption across health and eventually consumer sectors in WA and the rest of Australia.

3:45 - 4:05 Applications of an Internet-Facilitated Disease Management System in the Western Australian Health Sector Dr Caroline Spiranovic, Research and Development Associate, Sentiens Pty Ltd

Abstract
Disease management (DM) strategies are increasingly being applied in healthcare settings to effectively manage highly prevalent and chronic health conditions. To date, DM strategies have been incorporated into medical practice for a range of long term conditions such as diabetes, congestive heart failure, asthma, and obesity. These DM approaches have been bolstered through the implementation of internet infrastructures and other information technologies that offer costs effectiveness, increased efficiency, and improved outcomes in healthcare provision. This presentation will focus on describing the innovative applications of e-health infrastructures in managing chronic mental illness within the Western Australian health sector. Sentiens has developed, trialled, and implemented an internet-facilitated DM system for chronic mental health conditions. Sentiens is a specialist provider of mental health services in Perth and has developed a number of innovative approaches to healthcare. Sentiens has integrated an internet-based DM system into its existing clinic out-patient and newly developed Day Hospital in-patient programs to monitor and maintain the gains made by clients through these services. This comprehensive internet-facilitated DM system offers separate interfaces for mental health clients and providers. The client interface comprises scheduled sessions of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy exercises and worksheets, psycho-educational material, monitoring of symptom severity, medication adherence tracking, and automated email reminders for session completion. Other key features of the client interface include system generated progress reports, an e-diary for personal notes, an e-consultation request facility, and client editable privacy settings. The provider interface allows registered clinicians to monitor the progress and adherence of their clients on the system, respond to pending e-consultation requests, and refer new clients to the system. The research and health sector applications of this DM system support its efficacy as a tool for long-term monitoring and management of chronic mental illness.

4:05 - 4:25 Overcoming Obstacles – Blind Triumph in IT and Computer Networking Environments Ms Geraldine Lane, Lecturer, School of Information Systems, Curtin University of Technology

Abstract
Geraldine Lane lost her sight at age 35 and thought that her working life may be over as she could not secure a job. Previously she had been a Registered Nurse and had never encountered difficulties with attaining employment. Unemployment in the blind community is around 63%. Geraldine went on to qualify as a teacher in adult education and Cisco accreditation in IT and Computer Networking and now, not only is she employed by Curtin University of Technology as a lecturer, but she is also helping others who are blind or vision impaired to attain employment. Geraldine teaches Cisco accredited courses in Information Technology and Computer Networking to blind and vision impaired students from Australia and throughout the world. Last year Curtin University began a pilot program and employed Geraldine and a blind Co-lecturer to deliver these courses to 28 students from Australia and throughout the world. 24 of the inaugural students have since attained employment in the computer industry since completing the courses. This year (2008) they deliver the same courses to over 100 students world wide. They use a program called ‘Ventrillo’ to deliver live lectures to the students and use VOIP to assist students with any problems or discuss any concerns. Local WA students also participate and local students undertake practical laboratory work. For external students they complete their labs using virtual machines and virtual laboratories. Come and hear Geraldine’s story and find out how blind and vision impaired people access computers, and can become networking and IT professionals.

4:25 - 4:35 Closing Remarks Mr Travis Ingram, HIMAA(WA) President
4:35 – 5:00 Wine and Cheese